Rigor is creating an environment in which each student is expected to learn at high levels,
each student is supported so he or she can learn at high levels,
and each student demonstrates learning at high levels (Blackburn, 2008).

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Summer Update

It's been a busy June and start to July.  Last month, I was in Phoenix (twice), Austin and Houston, TX, Richmond and Accomack VA, and Louisville, KY.  Lots of great time with teachers and leaders, working on rigor, motivation, and student engagement.  This week, I'm in Nashville at the National Association of Elementary School Principals' Conference, and then I return here next week for the Southern Regional Education Board's National Staff Development Conference.  If you'll be at either conference, be sure to track me down--you can always tweet me @BarbBlackburn!

Friday, June 6, 2014

Time for a Break


It's that time of year.  If you are on a traditional schedule, I'm sure you are winding down the year.  For me, this starts the busiest time of the year, as I'm doing professional development for many schools and districts.  That means I won't be blogging regularly.  I'll post when I can, and look for the regular three times a week when the school year starts again in August.  Have a great summer!  Barbara

Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Professional Development Options

Are you looking for professional development for the 2014-2015 school year?  Check out my team and our options for keynotes, workshops, and technology-based PD.

Monday, June 2, 2014

What is Rigor?

Are you looking for a quick overview of my definition of rigor?  Check out the Beginner's Guide to Rigor.  It's short--just four pages and gives lots of examples.

Rigor is creating an environment in which each student is expected to learn at high levels, each student is supported so he or she can learn at high levels, and each student demonstrates learning at high levels.  


Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Teaching Students to Listen

Have you seen the SLANT model?  It's a series of tips to help students learn to listen.  

SLANT
Sit up
Lean forward
Act attentive using varied facial expressions
Nod when the person pauses, and
Track the speaker maintaining intermittent eye contact.

Monday, May 26, 2014

Adapting the K-W-L


Probably the most common method of identifying students’ prior knowledge that I see in classrooms today is a KWL chart. During a KWL activity, you ask the students what they already know about a topic (K) or what they think they know about it. Next, you ask what they want to know (W). Then, you teach the lesson and ask them what they learned (L).  You can also add an H—How Can We Learn This to create a K-W-H-L organizer.